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Fabrica La Aurora

Art and life, interwoven

For over 90 years, La Aurora was a bustling factory that spun out mountains of vibrant textiles. Now its industrial looms are silent, but colorful art has sprouted up among its ruins. This place once intertwined fibers; now it connects people. Come with us and explore La Aurora.

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Under a bright blue sky, we trace our fingers across the weathered bricks and wrought iron bars of La Aurora’s long facade. This structure is so different from the rest of San Miguel, with its towering Baroque and Neoclassical architecture.

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For over 90 years, La Aurora was a bustling factory that spun out mountains of vibrant textiles. Now its industrial looms are silent.

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We slip through the tall gates, expecting to discover rusty machinery and crumbling walls. Instead, there’s a bubbling fountain crowned with bright red flowers. Blooms aren’t the only beautiful things that have sprouted up in these ruins.

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A few steps past the fountain, we discover a gallery full of colorful paintings. Art and design have woven their way into everyday life at this factory-turned-community art space.

Room after room seems to overflow with exquisite objects, and it’s clear that no two spaces are alike.

As we drift down the main corridor, natural light pours in from expansive windows. Room after room seems to overflow with exquisite objects, and it’s clear that no two spaces are alike. There are immaculate gallery displays with masterpieces by Rivera, Picasso, and Warhol proudly housed alongside stunning works by local artists. Nearby,  crowded antique shops brim with intricate wood carvings and jewelry.

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This place is a crossroads for the city’s Spanish and native artists. In Spanish, they call this a mestizo culture: a melting pot.

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At the edges of the bustling crowd, there are clues to the history of La Aurora. A large iron is tucked in a corner and old machinery pokes up here and there. This place is a blend of the city’s contemporary voice and its history, and the city’s Spanish and native artists. In Spanish, they call this a mestizo culture: a melting pot.